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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,285 (some duplicates have been removed)
they do in texas. texas republicans are not so much trying to appeal to latinos. they are more just trying to make sure latinos can't vote. in 2011, texas republicans passed a bill that said you'd no longer be allowed to vote in texas unless you could provide documentation that you never had to show before, and that not everyone in the state has. governor rick perry signed that voter i.d. bill into law and then the federal government wrote the state of texas a nice note about it. "we've carefully considered the information you have provided about your new voter i.d. law. including the state's own estimate that as many as 800,000 registered texas voters do not have the kind of i.d. that texas republicans wanted to make people show before they'd be allowed to vote." it's not just any 800,000 texans who don't have it. "hispanic registered voters are more than twice as likely as non hispanic registered voters to lack such identification." under the new republican voting law in texas, hispanics would be twice as likely to not be allowed to vote. according to the state's own data. so the federal
district in texas is it should serve ten times as many voters as the whitest polling place. the justice department told that election district in texas that they could not do that. they could not make that change. the justice department looked at that plan and told them to try again. to try to find a way that was more fair. that happened because texas officials have to get an advanced okay from the justice department before they change their election laws. because of texas' history of racial discrimination in elections. discrimination like, oh, say, making the polling places for black and brown people handle ten times as many voters as the polling places for white people. because texas has done and has kept doing stuff like that, texas needs preclearance when they make changes. if they think they should not be on that preclearance list anymore, texas could apply to opt out. they could try to prove that they are not trying to discriminate anymore. texas has not been able to opt out. so the justice department was able to block that plan in that greater houston area college district. also
'm chris hayes. tonight on "all in" the blue revolution. i'll tell you why the great texas filibuster might have been just the beginning of something much, much bigger. >>> plus, on a week of huge victories for progressive america, the choice for the republican party becomes more and more clear. change or die. spoiler alert, they don't appear to be choosing to want to change. >>> and the cross-examination of rachel jeantel, reluctant witness in the trayvon martin case is a reluctant subject of national conversation. why what people say about her says more about them than the witness. >>> but tonight, we start with the uprising in the state of texas. an uprising that started last week when democrats and activists there began to mobilize against a restrictive abortion bill making its way through the texas senate. and that uprising has only gained strength. and if you want to know why, right now, people in texas are rising up and why it's not likely to end any time soon, let me tell you about texas governor rick perry's last 26 hours. at 6:37 p.m. last night, the state of texas executed its 50
.s. is becoming planet government. but not in texas. because joining us live on the set tonight, special guest host, governor rick perry. he's here to talk about his unprecedented tour across the country to personally lure businesses to the lone state. listen up. blue states, you're in trouble. rick perry and free market capitalism are coming to town. all those stories and more coming up on "the kudlow report," starting right now. >>> let's start. lead story tonight. here's my take on the fed announcement and the market move today. stocks as you know down over 2 houn points. first, please, don't panic. second, yes, the fed is going to slow down its bond purchases. but nobody knows when, including them. and it might not be until december or early next year. third point, the u.s. economy's still only growing sluggishly, only 2% growth. just about 1% inflation. modest profits. falling gold. and a steady king dollar. interest rates in my view are not going to skyrocket. there's more money to be made in stocks. the second half is going to be a slower slog than the first half. okay? that's my take o
you missed something incredible happening in the texas state senate. >> it was a late and wild night at the texas state house. a day long filibuster ending with a controversial vote on abortion restrictions. >> democrat wendy davis took the senate floor at 11:18 in the morning. the goal: filibuster for some 13 hours until midnight when the special session of the legislature would expire. >> john: it's just like the plot of frank capra's classic movie "mrs. smith wants an abortion." what exactly is at stake? >> at stake, a ban on abortions after 20 weeks and a requirement that all procedures be done at surgical centers. that would reduce the number of available abortion clinics in the state from 47 to 5. >> john: hold on. is five abortion clinics in 269,000 square miles really so bad? think about it. texas will still have three more abortion clinks than it has six flags amusement parks. let's be fair. when we're talking about math. if senator davis can talk 13 hours, texas women won't have to drive 13 hours to get an abortion. okay. how hard can that be? >> you can't trade off with a
of the democratic party, texas state senator wendy davis will be here to discuss her unbelievable filibuster, a dramatic 11-hour stand for women, and an improbable victory that captured the nation's attention last night. that's coming up, and speaking of rising stars. joaquin castro is here to talk about how the new fight for voter's rights, the critical issue, the 2014 election has already begun. but we begin with the monumental news that was delivered to us this morning by the supreme court of the united states. >> take a look now, huge crowds outside the supreme court today. >> the supreme court has just struck down the federal defense of marriage act. [ cheers and applause ] >> the law passed by congress in 1996, signed by president clinton that prevented the federal government from recognizing the validity of same sex marriages in the states where they're legal. >> children born today will grow up in a world without doma. the same children who happen to be gay will be free to love and get married, as thea and i did, but with the same federal benefits, protections and dignities and every
. and it was high drama at the texas state house last night where a bill that would close most abortion clinics in the state was defeated after activists packed the capital to support a texas state senator for more than 10-hour filibuster. >> sb 5 is dead. [applause] then president obama is up a new climate action plan. doesn't go far enough? we will have a debate. all that and more coming up. ? democracy now! ruling, the justices ruled congress used obsolete information in continuing to require nine states with a history of racial discrimination to obtain federal approval for changes to voting rules. the voting rights act was challenged by shelby county, alabama which argued the preclearance requirement has outlived its usefulness just two hours after the ruling texas began advancing a voter id law and redistricting maps that were blocked last year for restricting african-american and latino residents. we will have more on the decision with reverend jesse jackson. if president obama has unveiled a new climate plan featuring a series of executive actions to tackle global warming. he said addres
over his attempts to lure jobs to texas. this week he set his sights on high tax states of new york and connecticut. could yours be next? i don't alwe to eat like i should. that's why i like glucerna shakes. they have slowly digestible carbs to help minimize blood sugar spikes. [ male announcer ] glucerna. helping people with diabetes find balance. i did? when visa signature asked everybody what upgraded experiences really mattered... you suggested luxury car service instd of "strength training with patrick willis." come on todd! flap them chicken wings. [ grunts ] well, i travel a lot and umm... [ male announcer ] at visa signature, every upgradedxperience comes from listening to our cardholders. visa signature. your idea of what a card should be. visa signature. we've made major advancements in reducing the incidents of broken bones in seniors. we've received recognition for getting hypertension under control for over 80% of our members. we've made significant advances in asthma, immunization and maternity care. and j.d. power and associates ranked us highest in member satisfactio
on "to the contrary." >> first, texas state senator's wendy davis's rise to women's right stardom. >>> and then victory for same sex marriage with legal battles to come. >>> behind the headlines. flexism. what's that? we'll enlighten you. >> hello. i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to "to the contrary" a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. up first, wendy davis's fight continues. texas governor, rick perry, is calling the state legislature back into session for another go at anti-abortion legislation killed this week by a marathon filibuster. that filibuster shined a national spotlight on texas state senator, wendy davis. she stood for 11 hours in pink running shoes reading testimony from women and doctors who would have been impacted by the law. unable to lean on anything, take a break or a sip of water, she was buoyed on by hashtag, stand with wendy, celebrity tweets, and cheering supporters. the 50-year-old democrat has overcome other obstacles. she supported her single mother, became a teen mom, yet graduated from harvard law school. last year, her offices w
hangar. that is wisconsin and iowa in the past 48 hours. and then there is texas, and what is going on in texas is almost impossible to believe. even if you are not the biggest sports fan, it was game seven of the nba finals, and you would think everybody in texas would be glued to a tv set watching the spurs. but a lot of texans spent the night of game seven buried inside a state capital building until 3:45 in the morning. it was a takeover in austin. they completely upended the texas legislature. now, what is going on here has been odd politics from the beginning. we should have known something weird was going on when we started to see headlines like this back in may. texas lawmakers put down their swords. and then they decided they were going to stay away from all the hot button abortion issues they spent so much time on it, and this time around they are not going to leave it be and put down their swords. why would they change all of a sudden? oh, turns out they didn't change all of a sudden. it was a scam. they did not try to pass new anti-abortion legislation during the regular
5 is dead. >> that was cecile richards inside the texas state house after protesters blocked the passage of a bill that would have closed most of the state's abortion clinics. all that and more coming up. ? democracy now! the supreme court has paved the way for same-sex marriages to resume in california. in a 5-4 decision, the court ruled the defense of marriage act, signed by president clinton, is unconstitutional. this means legally married same- sex couples are entitled to claim the same benefits as heterosexual couples. i am honored and humbled and overjoyed to be here to represent the thousands of americans whose lives have been adversely impacted by the defense of marriage act, but those whose hopes and dreams have been constricted by the same discriminatory law. children today will grow up in the world without doma, and those same children who happen to be gay will be free to love and be married, with the same federal benefits, protections, and dignity as everyone else the dead heat it windsor sued the color of government because she was forced to pay additional taxes.
it is time for "the last word," with lawrence o'donnell. >>> texas senator wendy davis stood her ground at the filibuster, and now governor rick perry is trying to take her down. >> i'm not yielding for any questions at this time. >> something incredible happening in the texas state senate. >> a one-woman filibuster that lasted for 11 hours. >> it is sweeping the abortion bill, a bill that would ban abortion after 20 weeks, wendy successfully filibustered and the bill died. >> as governor perry vows to bring lawmakers back for another special session. >> incredible to see the legislative process be made a mockery. >> i am all about honest, open debate. >> texas two-step. >> does the republican party, in your view, understand the core value? >> she took a shot. >> unfortunate that she has not learned from her own example. >> they would do anything to pass this measure. >> they will resort to mob tactics to force their minority agenda on the people of texas. >> still the capitol. >> bravo, bravo. >> what we witnessed tuesday was nothing more than the hijacking of the democratic process. >
this, he said the texas statute undeniably seeks to further the belief of its citizens that certain forms of sexual behavior are immoral and unacceptable. the bauers decision held that this was a legitimate state interest the court today reaches the opposite conclusion, the texas statute furthers no legitimate state interest. if moral disapprobation of homosexual conduct is no legitimate state interest, what justification could there possibly be for denying the benefits of marriage to homosexual couples? right. i think i feel differently about that than you do. but right. justice scalia raised this point in horror ten years ago, ten years ago today. on the last big gay rights case that had its majority opinion written by justice kennedy. he was saying, you realize this ruling means gay people are going to be able to get married, right? you realize that? yes, justice scalia, we realize that, and indeed justice kennedy today cited that ten-year-old ruling twice, when he wrote today that the federal government has to recognize all marriages that are recognized in the states, even if so
in diversity. what they also did was heighten the standard for university of texas and now a lot of other schools in order to prove that this was narly taylored meaning there is no other way they could achieve a substantial amount of diversity without taking race into account. tavis: if you knew you were going to punt and i shouldn't say punt in reference to our supreme court justices. if you knew you were going to kick it back down to a lower court and 7 to 1 at that. everybody is waiting for this big decision and the answer is we're kicking it down to a lower court. why take the case if that's what you're going to do? >> i think you find a lot of negotiation going on. the case was argued in october and today we get a discussion. there was a lot of discussion in that interim period. have you two strong voices saying we're not going to have anymore period. have you the rest of the court and justice ginsberg saying what you said ten years ago this is fine we shouldn't be talking about it. i think there was a lot of negotiation behind the scenes about what the standard was going to be. how
. the senate could say it is one long, slow bleed in the case of fisher versus university of texas at austin. a white student rejected for admission, claiming racial discrimination. nothing will have an immediate effect on affirmative action at texas or any other school. they want to reexamine admissions policy. this is one of many factors and a stricter standard. anthony kennedy wrote the majority opinion, "consideration by the university is, of course, necessary, but not sufficient to satisfy strict scrutiny. the reviewing court must be satisfied that no race-neutral alternatives will produce the benefits of diversity. this will create a higher bar for any trying to justify race admission policies. raises the possibility of a firm rejection of affirmative action when the supreme court takes up a case like this again. the vote 7-1 this week, crossing a broad swath of the court beyond 5-4 ideological boundaries. and only justice ruth bader ginsberg dissented. and elena kagan recused herself, due to involvement while in the obama administration. we are bringing in molly ball of "atlantic maga
. a south texas beauty queen sexually assaulted, killed shortly after going to confession. suspicion turned to the priest but nothing stuck. police, though, they never gave up. so, now, 53 years later, evidence points only to the man who heard irene garza's final confession, the man they still suspect took her life. cnn's gary tuchman has the remarkable story. >> she had beautiful, shiny hair. she had this natural effervescence. >> she had the most musical type voice. >> she had a way with children and she smelled like flowers. >> reporter: in 1960, irene garza was raped and murdered in mcallen, texas. >> one thing i remember is just screams. >> there was a suspect. who do you believe killed irene garza? >> father john bernard feit. >> father john feit. back then, a catholic priest. >> no evidence in this case right now points us in any other direction. >> so why is he still a free man? by all accounts, irene garza was a remarkable young woman. >> she kind of broke the mold. >> irene's younger cousin, noemi sigler. >> at that time, hispanics stayed on one side of town, anglos lived on anoth
? >>> we can also agree it was great theater, the fill buster in texas that presented the bill that would shut down most of the state's abortion clinics. but the bill is likely pass next month anyway. the question, will abortion rights advocates around the country be inspired to copy what they saw on tuesday night. >>> ever wonder how supreme court reporters get their hands on decisions so fast? as it turns out, it takes a village, a real fast village. this is "hardball," the place for politics. >>> the manhunt no nsa leaker edward snowden has generated plenty of attention. one person who clearly doesn't think it's all that big of a deal, president obama. listen to what the president said about the hunt for snowden. >> no, i'm not going to be scrambling jets to get a 29-year-old hacker. >> the president said he hasn't spoken to the presidents of russia or china about snowden, and doesn't want the issue elevated so that it becomes a bargaining chip between america and her rivals. we'll be right back. >>> first of all, i think the supreme court ruling yesterday was not simply a victory for
? and governor rick perry takes aim at new york and connecticut in his bid to lure jobs to texas. could your state be his next target? welcome. some troubling poll numbers for president obama this week indicate that recent controversies including nsa surveillance and irs targ iing may be taking their toll. the president's overall job approve rating dropped 8%. 45% approving. 54% disapproving. that brings his real-clear politics to average well under 50%. but perhaps most worrisome for the white house is 17-point drop over the past month among people under 30. joining the panel this week, "wall street journal" columnist and deputy editor dan henninger. james freeman. and washington columnist kim. how do you read the drop in number? >> you are seeing different scandals ares are naturing with different groups. looking at the independents that cnn poll, you know, going back a month ago, 36% of independents thought that this was somehow -- tied the irs scandal to the white house. that number is more than 51%. then you go over to the millennials that 17-point drop you mentioned, that seems to be m
. >>> life and death. texas executes its 500th prisoner. >>> a huge day and a major witness at the george zimmerman murder trial. >>> plus, how the fallout from paula deen's is affecting giada e delaurenitis. >>> good morning. we begin with the supreme court and two major rulings that will be felt for decades as justices hands two major victories to same-sex couples. wednesday, justices gave federal recognition to same-sex couples and lifted a ban on gay marriage in california. today's newspapers called the decisions historic but fall short of going nationwide with the rulings 12 states and washington, d.c., now allow for same-sex marriage. proponents say the next step is nationwide recognition. pete williams has more. >> reporter: gay rights supporters crowded outside the court cheering the historic decisions. striking down a law passed by congress in 1996 the defense of marriage act known as doma. that blocked the federal government from recognizing same-sex marriages in the states that allow them. depriving them of benefits that other married couples have. in a 5-4 ruling, the court sa
flowers. >> reporter: in 1960, irene garza was raped and murdered in mcallen texas. >> one thing i remember is just screams. >> there was a suspect. who do you believe killed irene garza? father john. >> father john fight. back then, a catholic priest. >> no evidence in this case right now points us in any other direction. >> so why is he still a free man? by all accounts, irene garza was a remarkable young woman. >> she kind of broke the mold. >> irene's younger cousin, naomi sigler. >> at that time, hispanics staid one side of town, anglos lived in another side, and she kind of transcended that. >> she was gentle and sweet and beautiful. >> linda de livinia another cousin. >> she was a role model, to see how she had gone through college, was a teach, a butty queen, yet just a very sweet and simple person to us as children. >> but in 1960 the body of the inspiring woman was found face-down in this canal. she was 25. the age for thinking about getting married and raising a family. >> she didn't have a life. irene nerver had that chance. >> irene garza lived in this house in what wa
. >>> on friday night's show we reported on politics in texas going sort of off the hook. thursday night, protesters flocked to the texas state >>> on friday night's show we reported on politics in texas going sort of off the hook. thursday night, protesters flocked to the texas state capitol to mount effectively a citizens filibuster of sweeping new antiabortion legislation for the state. more than 700 people signed up thursday night to be witnesses to provide three minutes each of testimony to the assembly, to an assembly committee to try to slow down this antiabortion bill. it was on to 4:00 in the morning thursday night/friday morning when the republican chair of the committee finally yanked the proceedings and sent everybody home. that was thursday night into friday. a big remarkable show of force from the pro-choice side in texas politics. on friday night, we spoke with a democratic state representative, jessica farrar, who told us that the protest had been successful in slowing down the progress of that bill. which is is of material consequence here because the special session tha
allen, texas, in the 1930s was segregated. the neighborhoods, the schools. even in the hospital mexican americans and anglos were treat in separate wards. but when irene garza was born in 1934, her parents were determined that she and her sister josephine would transcend the discrimination together. >> we were very tight. we were very close because it was like us against all of those that were prejudice against us. >> prejudice against hispanics? >> hispanics, yes. and my dad fostered that because we're in it together. >> in their parents' day public schools are mcallen's children only went to fifth grade but the garzas had bigger dreams for their daughters. >> from the beginning we were told, when you go to college, when you go to college, it was something that was just a thing that was going to happen. >> if education was to be the way out, religion would show them the way up. parochial school for the elementary grades offered both. >> we were told, don't get mad pray, the catholic school, don't get mad, pray. we say we have to pray for so-and-so, we start praying. >> later at the pub
with a big step backyards for women's rights. all thanks to texas' cowboy boots in cheap governor rick perry. democratic senator wendy davis filibustered the bill for 11 hours, then the visitors shouted so loudly that the senate couldn't even vote. perry claimed that abortion clinics were protesting the bill because they're just in it for the money. >> if the abortion industry decide the expense of running clean, safe facility outweigh the money they could make, that's entirely their problem. >> michael: a decision that's already been made for them. just like this bill would do for women. perry also reconveneed the senate for another emergency session in july. the emergency being that they didn't pass this law. and he can keep on doing that, reconvening the state senate according to state law. today wendy davis responded on cbs news. >> no one knew for sure whether the governor would call us back for another session on this particular topic. i'm disappointed that did he but it shows his continued interest in intruding in the privacy of women and their decision making. it's big government int
. >> there is a war going on, a war against workers and the poor and public education. >> texas is calling. >> hello! >> you had me at hello. >> yeah, that's good. >> american voters are having, i think, buyers' remorse with radical republican governors. ♪ blame it on texas >> sorry, oops. >> remember that, rick? >> florida governor rick scott and texas governor rick perry. >> rick, rick, rick. >> republican governors are tripping all over one another. >> what's up, dude? >> i'm the dude. >> basically want to do what governor perry's done. >> i'll prove it. ♪ the stars at night are big and bright ♪ ♪ deep in the heart of texas >> talk about how you're going to turn the economy around. >> adios. >>. ♪ >> oh, sometimes i wish i was on the same stage with those guys. no, i'm not running. but i love to talk about them. here he is, again, he's back at it. slick rick perry. the governor of texas. it is all hat and no cattle. just wrapped up a five-day poaching tour for jobs in the northeastern portion of the united states. now, how many liberals are up in the northeastern portion of the united s
to restrict abortion rights in texas. and our political round table on the future of gay marriage, whether immigration reform can pass in the house, and the debate over edward snowden, is the fugitive a high priority for the obama administration and will he be produce tbrought to . >>> good sunday morning. nelson mandela remains in critical but stable condition, another emotional day ahead for problem. he arrive this had cape town a short time ago and is spekd the morning at robben island, the jail will mandel was held for 18 of the 27 years of his confinement. saturday the president met privately and spoke about the former leader's legacy. >> as you you go forward, i want you to position of the map who is in our prayers today. think about 27 years of prison respect think about the hardships and struggles, being away from family and friends. reflecting on his years in prison, nelson mandela wrote that there were dark moments that tested his faith in humanity, but he refused to give up. >> all of this amid significant political challenges and debates back home in washington. we'll get right
, takes on texas governor rick perry. and new attempts to restrict abortion rights in texas. >>> and our "political roundtable" on the future of gay marriage, whether immigration reform can pass in the house, and the debate of snowden. will he be brought to justice. >> announcer: from nbc new in washington, the world's longest-running television program, this is "meet the press" with david gregory. >>> good sunday morning. as nelson mandela remains in critical but stable condition. another emotional day for president obama. he arrived in cape town a short time ago and is spending the day at robin island, the jail where mandela was held for the 18 of his 27 years of confinement. saturday the president met privately with some of mandela's children and grandchildren and discussed the former leader's legacy. >> as you go forward, i want you to think of the man who's in our prayers today. think about 27 years in prison. think about the hardships and the struggles of being away from family and friends. reflecting on his years in prison, nelson mandela wrote that there were dark moments that te
. women should be forced to have an ultra sound if they don't want one? >> the eyes of texas, the eyes of the country are watching. >> she didn't come from particularly good circumstances. >> it really isn't for him it make statements like that. >> it is just unfortunate that she hasn't learn fed her own example. >> i think it demeans the office that hold. >> at what point must a female senator raise her hand or her voice to be recognized over the male colleagues in the room? >> all right. we've got a showdown in texas over the women's health. this is going on across our country. tomorrow at 2 okay p.m., governor rick perry will try once again to pass anti-choice senate bill 5 back into law. he brought lawmakers back for yet another special session. this all comes on the heels, or should i say running shoes, by state senator wendy davis. that halted perry's efforts and energized supporters of women's rights around the country. as male counter parts tried to shut davis down, one democratic senator latisha vandapute continued talking. coming from her father's funeral. >> at what do the f
a dramatic night in the texas state senate, where a marathon filibuster and chanting activists foiled a last-minute push to pass new restrictions on abortions. >> ifill: and margaret warner updates the mounting tensions in egypt, as president mohammed morsi addresses his nation and the opposition plans large scale protests. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> supported by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: supporters of same-sex marriage claimed a twin win today, coming on the final day of the u.s. supreme court's term. both of the closely-watched cases were decided, five-to- four. ray suarez begins our coverage. >> reporter: outside the court building, supporters of
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,285 (some duplicates have been removed)